impact of technology use on our rangatahi

Brainwave Review: Issue 32

We look into the impact of technology use on our rangatahi. In our first article Sue Younger, one of our Trustees, shares some of what’s known in this area of research.

Despite the ever-growing body of science about the development of our tamariki, what they need on a daily basis often boils down to some simple things. Our second article, written by Keryn O’Neill, our Knowledge Manager, looks at some of the learning that is happening right under your nose, whilst doing the grocery shopping, for example.

To read the full review click here.

Everyday opportunities: lots of learning

We explore a few of the many things your tamariki are learning as you go about daily life together, taking supermarket shopping as an example.

To read the full article, click here.

Short-term highs, long-term risks

While many people can use cannabis and not seem to suffer ill-effects directly, the younger, the longer, and the more often people use cannabis, the more likely they are to suffer from a range of harms later in life. It may not be at all clear to them, or others, that their use of cannabis has contributed to their difficulties.

To read the full article, click here.

Tamariki and Technology: Insights From The Research

Our babies are surrounded by rapidly advancing technology. We absorb ever-changing information technology into our lives at a breakneck speed.  But many are wondering how this technology affects babies and young children?

To read the full article click here.

Supporting Children’s Social and Emotional Development

When children grow up to be flourishing adults it is no accident. When they are able to take on responsibility, contribute to their whānau and community and when they are a good friend, partner or parent, it is almost always due to early support.

To read the full article, click here.

Print or e-book

Print or e-book does it matter?

Our senior Researcher, Keryn O’Neill, gives us insight into this topic, to read the full article, click here 

Brainwave Review Issue 26: talking, listening and reading

Our latest edition of the Brainwave Review is very timely in light of reports last week in the media about the declining reading levels of NZ children.

Understanding how to support the early experiences of children’s language development is one important step in reversing this concerning trend. Brainwave Trust has spent a lot of time this year reviewing research in this area. This review of the academic literature forms the basis of both articles in this edition, written by our Senior Researcher, Keryn O’Neill.

The first article Nourishing our babies: Why Listening and Talking Matter explores what research indicates are some of the ingredients of a nourishing early language environment, and the important role of parents and other adults.

The second article goes on to consider Why Reading Really Matters and reviews research indicating that the earlier parents begin reading with their children, and the more books children are exposed to, the better their later outcomes in reading and many areas are likely to be.

Please click here to read the Brainwave Review.